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THE STRUGGLE FOR CANADA   97

because Amherst refused to accede to the demand made by Levis, as the Commander-in-Chief of the regular troops, that the garrison be accorded the honours of war. Levis, in anger, proposed, if this were not granted, to retire with the regular troops to St. Helen Island, and there resist to the last extremity. Amherst persisting in his stand, for the purpose, as he put it, of manifesting his disapproval of the acquiescence of the French throughout the war in the barbarous acts of their Indian allies, Vaudreuil, on September 8th, 1760, affixed his signature to the Articles of Capitulation, which, subject to subsequent treaty, not only sealed the fate of Montreal, but formally surrendered to Britain all of New France from the Mississippi to Cape Breton.

The next day a detachment of the British army under Colonel Haldimand entered Montreal to take formal possession, and at the Place d'Armes the regular regiments of the French garrison were drawn up and surrendered their arms. The British force at once mounted guards and posted sentries, and that night for the first time English drums beat the sunset tattoo in the streets of Mont-real. The French regulars and officials were, in accordance with the terms of capitulation, sent to France. The English colonial troops with Amherst's armies were also returned to their homes.

After the capitulation had been signed, Major Rogers, with 300 of his trusty rangers, was sent to receive the final submission of the outlying French posts at Detroit, St. Joseph, Michilimackinac, Ste. Marie, and La Baie des Puants (Green Bay), and to escort their commanders to Quebec. Having delivered despatches to General Monckton at Fort Pitt, Rogers soon reached Presqu' isle (Erie, on Lake Erie), where he was joined by some Indians and provincials. Dividing the combined force into two parties, Rogers and his detachment proceeded to Detroit in boats, while the remainder went by land. On landing one evening before reaching Detroit, he was confronted by Pontiac, an Ottawa chief, who demanded by what


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