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THE STRUGGLE FOR CANADA   89

army fled, seeking safety behind the strong Beauport lines. Vaudreuil and his officers were in a panic, and for a moment it looked as if the whole French army would be destroyed or captured. But a large force was coming down from the west, Wolfe was dead, Monckton was seriously wounded, and the army was in no condition to follow up its victory. The work of intrenching on the battlefield was at once begun and preparations made for the bombardment of Quebec. Meanwhile, Vaudreuil with his army, now a disorganized rabble, was skirting the rear of the city in hurried flight towards Montreal.

On September 17th, the British artillery on the west of the city and the British ships of war in front of it were ready to concentrate their fire on its defences. The citizen soldiers under Ramesay had no heart for resistance. They had been abandoned by the army and surrender or destruction was inevitable. So Ramesay sent out a flag of truce to the British camp, and entered into negotiations with Townshend, now in command of Wolfe's army, preliminary to capitulation. Next day Quebec capitulated, and the advance guard of the British army marched into the city, lowered the Fleur-de-Lis, and replaced it with the Union Jack. Some of the units of the British Army were at once embarked for home, or for the old English colonies in America, and late in October the British fleet in front of Quebec weighed anchor and left for various stations. General Townshend returned to England, General Monckton went to New York, while General Murray was left in command at Quebec, with some 7,000 men, a force under ordinary circumstances sufficient to withstand any army Levis could bring against it.

The main body of the French army retired directly to Montreal, leaving strong detachments posted in a fortified position which defended the crossing of the Jacques-Cartier river. From this position small parties were sent out from time to time to worry the English and keep them in a state of constant alarm. Notwithstanding


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