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80   MILITARY HISTORY OF CANADA

the country for miles on either flank was carefully reconnoitered.

Amherst spent a whole month in the transport of stores and cannon from Fort Edward, and in providing the necessary bateaux and other craft for his future operations, and it was not until July 22nd that he arrived near Ticonderoga, the scene of Abercromby's bloody defeat. Mindful of the lesson there taught, he carefully reconnoitred the French position, and as carefully and methodically made his dispositions for carrying it on the morrow. But Bourlamaque, who commanded the place, in obedience to his instructions from Montcalm, retired to Crown Point on Amherst's approach. Hebecourt, his second in command, held out for three days under a brisk fire and then escaped with his garrison after setting fire to the magazine, but only one bastion of the fort was destroyed. With the same deliberation as before, Amherst strengthened Ticonderoga, accumulated necessary supplies, and completed transport arrangements for a further advance. On August 4th, the English army took possession of Crown Point, the French having vacated this post also and re-treated to Isle-aux-Noix.

For more than two months Amherst was busy strengthening the works at Ticonderoga and Crown Point, and in making ready to advance down Lake Champlain. The French had four armed vessels on the lake, and he judged it necessary to have an equally strong fleet constructed to protect his communications with his base. The middle of October had arrived before the French naval force had been driven from the lake, and arrangements had been completed for pursuing the French to Isle-aux-Noix, but the lateness of the season and the unfavourable state of the weather put an end for that year to all further progress. Amherst then settled his troops for the winter at Crown Point, Fort George, built by him on the site of Fort William Henry, and Albany. He had not succeeded in reaching the St. Lawrence and aiding Wolfe in his attack upon Quebec—the main object


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