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THE STRUGGLE FOR CANADA   77

This ended the operations for the year, and despite the brilliant success at Ticonderoga, the net result was most discouraging for the French. Although the British at-tempt to drive the French from Lake Champlain had failed, the defeated British general had been able to detach from his army a force which had destroyed the chief military depot on the Great Lakes and had reduced the naval armament on Lake Ontario to such an extent that its military efficiency practically disappeared; the chief French post in the Ohio valley had been occupied by the enemy, and the only French naval base on the Atlantic seaboard had been reduced. There was a shortage of nearly every warlike necessity in Canada, and, due to Britain's mastery of the sea, the colony was cut off from the mother-country. The possession of Louisbourg and Halifax, now a considerable naval station, gave the British practical control of the approaches to the St. Lawrence.

During the autumn and winter of 1758, the British Government, in concert with the colonial authorities in America, formed plans on a large scale for completing the reduction of Canada. A strong military force, under General Jeffery Amherst, was to resume offensive operations against the French positions on Lake Champlain, the Richelieu, and the Upper St. Lawrence, with Montreal as its ultimate destination. At the same time, a powerful fleet under Admiral Saunders and an army under General Wolfe were to move up the St. Lawrence against Quebec. A third expedition, under General Prideaux, was to be directed against Fort Niagara, with a view to ending French power in the Great Lake region. Moreover, strong detachments, under General Stanwix, were to re-establish the principal British positions south of the Great Lakes, and to capture the line of French military posts extending from Lake Erie towards the Ohio.

Meanwhile, Vaudreuil, as Governor of Canada, and Montcalm, as commander of the troops in the field, were agreed as to the importance of remaining on the defensive, but there was no cordial feeling or mutual confidence


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