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76   MILITARY HISTORY OF CANADA

This exploit was far-reaching in its influence on the progress of the war, but its significance was lost sight of at the time on account of the spectacular fight at Ticonderoga. The victors captured, besides a large quantity of munitions and other military stores, nine armed vessels, including those taken from the British at Oswego.' Before with-drawing across the lake, Bradstreet razed the fort to the ground. His achievement imperilled French power in the west, and the reduction of Fort Niagara at the upper end of Lake Ontario became a foregone conclusion.

The British expedition for the capture of Fort Duquesne, composed of 1,500 regular troops and some 5,000 colonial militia, was commanded by General Forbes. It left Philadelphia in July, but, owing to the difficulties en-countered in crossing the Alleghany mountains, the Monongahela river was not reached until four months later. Captain Ligneris, who commanded at Duquesne, endeavoured to check Forbes' advance by sending out small parties of scouts and bush-fighters to harass his troops while passing through rough and timbered country, but the British force was not materially impeded, and on November 23rd Ligneris evacuated the fort after destroying by fire as much of it as he could. The British, after restoring the damage done, established themselves in the place and called it Pittsburg. Thus was sealed the fate of the other French posts in the valley of the Ohio, the links connecting Canada with her sister French colony, Louisiana.

1 On a map in the British Museum it is stated that the French had on the St. Lawrence and Lake Ontario in 1757, four government vessels, La Marquise de Vaudreuil, La Louise, Le Victort, and La Huzalt. The Marquise de Vaudreuil and La Huzalt were topsail schooners of sixteen and fourteen guns respectively, La Louise, a schooner of ten guns and Le Victort a sloop of eight guns. According to the same authority the British flotilla on Lake Ontario and the Upper St. Lawrence in 1758, after the capture of Fort Frontenac, included the following vessels: Montcalm (captured from the French), George, Lively, Vigilant, Ontario, and another, the name of which is unrecognizable. Judging from the pictures on the map mentioned, the Montcalm was a brig of twenty guns, the George one of eighteen, the vessel with the undistinguishable name, a topsail schooner of twelve, the Vigilant a sloop of twelve guns, and the Ontario one of ten guns.


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