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72   MILITARY HISTORY OF CANADA

The whole was under the command of the Governor, Chevalier de Drucour, an able seaman, but inexperienced in land operations.

The invading force arrived off Louisbourg on June 1st, but owing to rough weather a landing was not effected until the 8th. Brigadier-General James Wolfe ably led the landing party, getting his division ashore in the face of a strongly defended position, strengthened by a masked battery, and routing the party posted to dispute the landing. Every effort was concentrated on getting the troops, siege train, and supplies ashore, and Amherst, establishing himself on a low-lying marshy area behind the fort, began preparations for its capture by bombardment and sapping operations. Meanwhile, Wolfe, who displayed throughout great energy and skill, made a detour around the harbour with a column of 1,200 men and took possession of Lighthouse Point, which had been abandoned by the French. Guns and mortars were in due time installed upon this position, and fire opened on the Island Battery guarding the entrance of the harbour. The guns of this battery being silenced, Wolfe on the 25th rejoined headquarters. With characteristic deliberation Amherst pushed forward his intrenchments towards the landward defences of the place, while the French attempted a couple of gallant sallies, but were driven back. To prevent the British fleet from entering the harbour after the Island Battery had been dismantled, the French sank six of their large ships in the entrance. One frigate, the Arethuse, broke through the blockading fleet and put to sea, while the greater part of the crews of the remaining vessels went ashore to assist in manning the guns. In July, Boishebert, with some 400 Canadians, Acadians, and Micmac Indians, made a half-hearted attack upon some of the British outposts, but was easily driven off. On July 16th, a party under Wolfe captured an eminence known as Gallows Hill, some 300 yards from the Dauphin's Bastion, and promptly dug themselves in, using the position for a new approach. A few days afterwards


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