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THE STRUGGLE FOR CANADA   67

the complete rout of the French forces. The British loss was 262 in killed, wounded, and missing, that of the French, according to their own report, 228, but it was probably much greater. General Johnson was slightly wounded, Dieskau severely.

Johnson was then urged to resume his march against the French forts at Crown Point and Ticonderoga (Carillon), the latter recently constructed between Lake Champlain and Lake George. He declined, however, as his men were but poorly armed, and unfit to oppose the well-equipped and disciplined French regulars. On the site of the recent conflict, he caused a wooden stockade or fort to be built, which he named Fort William Henry, and manned it with a garrison of New England militia. He also strengthened Fort Lyman, and changed its name to Fort Edward, after one of the King's grandsons.

Despite Dieskau's severe defeat, the general result of the campaign of 1755 was not unfavourable to the French. Three out of the four English expeditions had failed, for the French remained undisputed masters of the Ohio valley, and they still held Niagara and Crown Point.

During the winter of 1755-1756 extensive preparations for prosecuting the war were made by both sides in Europe and America. The English proposed to continue the operations attempted the previous year, and new generals and additional troops were promised by the mother-country. France sent 1,000 troops and four generals,—the Marquis de Montcalm, as Commander-in-Chief, with Chevalier de Levis, Comte de Bougainville, and Chevalier de Bourlamaque as brigadiers.

Montcalm was most unfavourably impressed by the conditions he found in the colony, and in a letter he speaks of more or less disorder in all parts of the administration; dishonesty on the part of most of the public functionaries; weakness of the Governor; jealousies and ill-feeling among the officers of the three branches of the military service,—the regular army, the Colony Troops, and the militia; controversies between the civil and


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