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60   MILITARY HISTORY OF CANADA

was carried out to the letter, for a party of the invaders obtained possession of the Royal Battery, which had been deserted by the French, and in its guns used their home-made ammunition for battering down the walls. Later on, ten large French cannon, which had been buried by the enemy at low tide, were unearthed and added to the batteries of the attackers. After the siege had proceeded for some time, British ammunition and supplies ran low, and a crisis was approaching, when the French man-of-war, Vigilant, carrying an abundance of munitions and stores, hove in sight and was captured by the blockading fleet,—another gift from the goddess of chance!

The siege began on April 30th, 1745, and on June 15th Louisbourg surrendered. A provincial force garrisoned the fortress until the following spring, when it was replaced by regular troops, who held it until 1749, in spite of several attempts by France to recover possession. Eleven French ships of the line, with transports carrying 3,000 soldiers, were despatched in 1746, under Admiral d'Anville, to co-operate with a body of troops from Canada under M. de Ramesay, in an attempt to retake Cape Breton. This undertaking proved a failure, owing to adverse weather and the breaking out of an epidemic in the fleet when near Chibucto Bay (now Halifax Harbour). Admiral d'Anville and 2,400 of his men were carried off by the disease, which also proved destructive to large numbers of French Canadians and Abnaki who had gone down to the coast to join d'Anville.

Another strong fleet consisting of six ships of the line, and thirty transports, under Admiral de la Jonquiere, left France in the spring of 1747 on the same errand. La Jonquiere had been appointed Governor of Canada, to succeed the Marquis de Beauharnois, and was to re-take Louisbourg on his way out to his post. But Admirals Anson and Warren, in command of an English fleet, fell in with La Jonquiere's squadron and on May 3rd, 1747, captured all the French war vessels, and a large part of the convoy.


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