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CHAPTER III

THE STRUGGLE FOR CANADA

 

THE great "Fighting Governor" was no more, but his achievements had a most stimulating effect on New France. Under the regime of Louis Hector de Callieres, who in 1699 succeeded his old chief and comrade-in-arms as Governor of Canada, the country experienced exceptional growth. Settlements were ex-tended up the St. Lawrence, the Chaudiere, the Riche-lieu, and the Ottawa, and new trading posts were established in the west and southwest. Callieres put the relations with the Iroquois on a somewhat more satisfactory footing, and, in 1703, when war was once more declared between England and France, Canada was spared serious trouble with the Five Nations, while the English colonists suffered severely from the frequent incursions of the Abnaki. In revenge, the English invaded the Abnaki country with fire and sword, whereupon the French, to assist their allies, sent against the English colonies a war party under M. de Rouville, who fell upon Deerfield, on the river Connecticut, in the night time, and the fearful scenes of Schenectady and Salmon Falls were again enacted. The town was burnt, about fifty persons slaughtered, and upwards of 100 prisoners carried off. Later on the town of Haverhill was raided, but here the attack was made in broad daylight, and about fifty soldiers aided the inhabitants in their fruit-less resistance. These bloody incursions strengthened in the English colonies the determination utterly to destroy the French colony, and in 1709 the people of New England, in conjunction with the Home Government, made preparations on a large scale for ending French rule in Newfoundland, Acadia, and Canada.

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