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THE SOLDIER GOVERNOR   53

 

days' bombardment, La Forest, d'Iberville's lieutenant, who had been left in charge of the post, surrendered.

In 1697, d'Iberville, accompanied by his brother, Serigny, was despatched to Hudson Bay by the French government with five warships, the Pelican, the Palmier, the Wesp, the Profound, and the Violent. The Pelican, d'Iberville's ship, became separated from her consorts in the ice fields and reached Fort Nelson first. While the French commander meditated landing to attack the place, three of the Hudson's Bay Company's vessels, the Hampshire, Dering, and Hudson's Bay, approached his anchorage. D'Iberville, having the advantage of heavier guns and a stronger ship, attacked the English vessels without hesitation, and after a hot fight, the Hampshire, the largest of the Company's ships, was sunk with all hands, the Hudson's Bay was forced to surrender, while the Dering made her escape. The Pelican and the Hudson's Bay were so badly damaged as to be almost unmanageable, and during a fierce storm which arose while the fight was in progress they were driven aground and became complete wrecks. It is interesting to note that on board the Pelican were a company of Canadians and some Indian sharp-shooters in charge of La Potherie, the historian of this thrilling naval battle. D'Iberville and his followers succeeded in reaching shore, but lost every-thing excepting their arms and a few effects. They were in a most precarious condition until the arrival of the remainder of the French ships, which had finally succeeded in extricating themselves from the ice. A strong landing party having been put ashore, heavy-gun batteries were established and mortars landed from the ships, and a regular siege was begun. Bayly, the Governor, did his best, but his small guns were no match for the heavier artillery of the enemy, and he was compelled to surrender. He was accorded all the honours of war, and his motley garrison of traders, clerks, and apprentices marched out with arms and baggage, drums beating and colours flying. When


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