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42   MILITARY HISTORY OF CANADA

appealed to England for assistance, and, burying for the time their local jealousies, called a congress of representatives of the various colonies in May, 1690. It was then decided to raise and equip at Albany a land force of 1,300 men to march to Montreal, and at Boston a combined sea and land force of thirty vessels, 1,500 seamen, and 1,300 militia for the capture of Quebec. The two expeditions were to advance simultaneously against Mont-real and Quebec, neither of which was considered strong enough to oppose singly the forces planned for its attack. Both expeditions were placed under the supreme command of Sir William Phips, who, previous to sailing with the main expedition, was despatched to Acadia in command of seven vessels and some 700 men. He quickly took possession of all of the French posts in that colony, including Port Royal, Penobscot, La HSve, and Chedabucto, and returned to Boston on the last day of May having with him as prisoners Robineau de Menneval, Governor of Port Royal, two priests, and fifty-nine soldiers belonging to the Colony Troops.

During his absence preparations for the Quebec expedition had gone on. Massachusetts had asked the mother-land for assistance. England could render no aid to her children overseas, so Massachusetts had to depend on her own resources. Volunteers offered readily as sailors or soldiers, but impressment had to be resorted to before the requisite complement of 2,200 was obtained. Thirty vessels were requisitioned, most of them of small capacity. The largest was a West India trader carrying forty-four guns, called the Six Friends, the second largest, the John and Thomas, of twenty-six guns. Three vessels were contributed by the colony of New York, one of twenty-four guns, one of eight, and the other of four.

Phips set sail from Nantasket for Quebec in August, but owing to adverse winds the fleet did not arrive at Tadoussac until October 3rd, and it took twelve days more to reach the Island of Orleans. The difficulties of ascending the river were increased owing to the lack of a competent


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