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30   MILITARY HISTORY OF CANADA

the whole country south of the Great Lakes, while the Hudson's Bay Company, founded in 1670, was rapidly securing a monopoly of the northern and western fur trade. The English colonists, led by Governor Dongan of New York, were intriguing with the Iroquois, sustaining and encouraging them in acts of hostility towards the French. Fortunately for New France, Dongan was greatly hampered by the unsettled state of affairs in England, James II being then upon the throne, and con-fronted with a revolution which resulted in the loss of his crown. Denonville, experienced soldier as he was, realized, none the less, the weakness of the colony, and appealed to France for reinforcements. "Nothing can save us," he wrote, "but the sending out of troops and the building of forts and block-houses, yet I dare not begin to build them, for if I do it will bring down all the Iroquois upon us before we are in a condition to fight them." In 1686, Louis XIV sent a generous supply of troops, money, and munitions, and ordered Denonville to attack the Iroquois towns.

In the spring of 1687, a force consisting of 1,000 Canadians, 800 regulars, and about 300 Indians—Hurons, Algonkins, Abnaki, and Caughnawagas—assembled in Montreal. With this force, Denonville, on July 1st, arrived at Fort Frontenac, where he received the welcome intelligence that Henri de Tonti, a fur trader from Fort St. Louis, southwest of Lake Michigan, with about 200 warriors of the Illinois tribe, Nicholas Perrot, with a contingent of Indians from the west side of the same lake, and La Durantaye, with a party of Hurons, were on their way eastward to join him. While at Fort Frontenac, Denonville, in accordance with orders received from France, caused a number of Iroquois chiefs and warriors to be enticed to Fort Frontenac, and there seized and placed in confinement. These were ultimately sent to France to work in the King's galleys, an act of treachery never forgotten and never forgiven by the Iroquois.

Crossing to the south side of Lake Ontario, Denonville


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