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22   MILITARY HISTORY OF CANADA

mouth of the St. John river in New Brunswick, were the scenes of frequent conflicts.

The English had a jealous eye on the growing settlements in Acadia, considering them a menace to the New England colonies. So in 1654, under Cromwell's orders, Major Robert Sedgwick attacked Port Royal and compelled its commander to surrender, and the place was to remain in the hands of the English until restored to France in 1667 by the Treaty of Breda.

So far Acadia had been largely independent of Canada, but with the coming of Royal Government its affairs were to be controlled mainly from Quebec. Acadia had now a number of scattered settlements, but the only considerable fortified settlement was at Port Royal, which could boast a population of 361 and had 364 acres of land under cultivation. The settlers lived on the most friendly terms with all the Indians, and Acadia never suffered from Indian wars. In this way there was not the same need of military preparedness as along the St. Lawrence and, excepting for the few soldiers stationed in the forts, there was no military life in the country.


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