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PIONEER SOLDIERS OF CANADA   21

In the following year the promoters of this settlement removed what was left of their colonists and belongings to Port Royal (Annapolis Basin), and opposite what is now Goat Island, about six miles from the present town of Annapolis, built a somewhat pretentious fort. The fort and the trading rights in Acadia were granted by de Monts to Jean de Biencourt de Poutrincourt, Baron de Saint Just, and the grant was afterwards confirmed by the King of France. Champlain, the future founder of Quebec, was active in this attempt to plant the Lilies of France on American soil. After two years, Port Royal was abandoned and for three years the place remained untenanted. In 1610, it was once more occupied and a number of settlers found homes within range of the guns of the little fort. But, in 1613, the existence of Port Royal was for the time being to come to an end. In that year, Captain Samuel Argall of Jamestown, Virginia, totally destroyed "the fort and all monuments and marks of French power."

In those days England claimed Acadia by right of the discoveries of the Cabots, and King James I made a very wide grant in this region to Sir William Alexander. As a result, a colony of Scots was planted not far from the site of the French fort. Between the years 1621–1631 these colonists struggled to maintain a foot-hold in New Scotland, as they had re-christened Acadia. But, in 1631, King Charles, then on friendly terms with France, ordered Alexander "to demolish his fort and leave it altogidder waist and unpeopled as it was at the time your sone landed there." This was done and save for some of the colonists who stayed in the country, having married Indian women or daughters of the first French settlers who had taken up a forest life, not a trace of Alexander's colony remained.

For the next thirty-odd years there were petty quarrels in Acadia between holders of trading rights, and Port Royal, established in 1633 or 1634, on the site of the present town of Annapolis, and Port Latour, at the


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