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PIONEER SOLDIERS OF CANADA   13

the French settlements in Canada, and Ville Marie was chosen as the first object of their fury. During the latter part of the winter, two strong war parties of the Iroquois were gradually assembled west and east of Ville Marie, the one on the Ottawa river, the other near the mouth of the Richelieu. As the snow left the forests and the ice the rivers, these two war parties prepared for a concerted attack.

Their intentions soon became known in Ville Marie and throughout the whole colony of New France, and the prospect of successfully defending the colony appeared slight. But Adam Dollard or Daulac, Sieur des Ormeaux, a gallant young Frenchman, believed that, by appealing to the spirit of devotion which animated the youth of the colony and by using proper strategy, the Iroquois might be held off. He planned having a party of volunteers intrench themselves on the route over which one or other of the enemy expeditions must pass, to impede, as long as possible, the advance of the war party. The plan appealed to Maisonneuve, but the force at his disposal was distressingly small, and he warned Dollard that, in the event of his approving of his scheme, he could spare him but few soldiers, as it was necessary that sufficient men should be left behind to guard Ville Marie and its outlying posts. Once his project was authorized, Dollard had little difficulty in securing volunteers to accompany him, sixteen of the bravest young men of the little garrison binding themselves by oath to fight with Dollard to the death, and to accept no quarter. Before embarking upon the enterprise each man made his will, and, their worldly matters disposed of, all proceeded to the little chapel of the Hotel Dieu, where they received the Blessed Sacrament. The heroic band then set out on their adventurous mission, passing the Lachine rapids, entering the Ottawa, and crossing the Lake of the Two Mountains. Up the Ottawa river, Dollard and his party travelled for several days, landing close to the foot of a rapid or fall, and en-camping near a little stockade which had been previously


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