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FUR-FARMING IN CANADA   21

Thus, it may be concluded that, in a district where melanism occurs, or where black and cross foxes occur, or either, there are very few foxes bred pure as to colour.

If the unit of union be regarded as of gametes which are produced by each parent in the proportion of its ancestors—red and silver—the results may be forecasted by a simple mathematical calculation, the Law of Probabilities governing the mating of the gametes.

+

R.R.
Red parent producing
only red gametes

B.B.
Black parent producing
only black gametes

R.B.   R.B.   R.B.   R.B.

(red, bastard   (red, bastard   (red, bastard   (red, bastard

type)   type)   type)   type)

+

R.B.
Producing half red and half
black gametes

R.B.

Producing half red and half black gametes

R.B.   R.B.   R.B.   B.B.

+

R.B.

Producing half red and half black gametes

B.B. Producing only black gametes

I   I   ~

R.B.   R.B.   B.B.   B.B.

It will be noticed that when the black colour (B.B.) appears the animal is always pure, while R.R. is pure red and R.B. is also red with darker points.

It is well to bring out clearly the average results to be expected, as considerable speculation is indulged in as to whether or not certain foxes when bred to a silver will produce some silver pups. As much as $500 each has been paid for red pups that have one silver parent, be-cause it is expected that, if the pup is mated to a silver, the resulting litter will be composed of silver and red foxes in about equal numbers. The hopes are realized in most instances; but many chances of securing silver pups are lost because the breeder gets only red pups the first generation and becomes discouraged.

Picture

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