Previous Fur Farming in Canada (1913) Next

 

20   COMMISSION OF CONSERVATION

"And so with characters generally. Many will blend and many others will not. When they will not blend, then the appearence is still less a guide to the real hereditary qualities, and under these circumstances it is little or no index to what will happen when the mixture is bred. This fact was long a great stumbling -block to breeders, involving the business of improvement in unfortunate and as we now know, unnecessary mystery."

Silver Colour Suppose that a breeder has a sil,er fox, which, being

Mendelian   recessive, always breeds true, and he chooses a pure type Recessive to

Red of red fox for a mate, being careful in order to secure pureness of type to obtain the red fox from a district where no melanism exists. Let the red fox be denoted by R. R. and the black or silver fox by B. B. (As to results, the sexes are equal in influence.)

R.R.   +   B.B.

I   I

R.B   R.B   R.B   R.B

(red)   (red)   (red)   (red)

All pups are red, but of the bastard type mentioned above, with blacker points,—legs, muzzles and ears. They are really half black, but the colour is hidden or recessive in the first generation, red being dominant.

 

There are now two methods by which he can proceed to secure the black colour or pure B.B.

First method:   R.B.   +   R.B.

I   I

   R.R.   R.B.   R.B.   B.B.

(pure red)   (red)   (red)   (pure silver or black)

Results: One-quarter of the litter is pure red

One-half of the litter is red of the bastard type One-quarter of the litter is black or silver

   Second method:   R.B.   +   B.B.

I   I   1

R.B.   R.B.   B.B.   B.B.

(red)   (red)   (pure silver   (pure silver

   or black)   or black)

Results: One-half of the litter is red of the bastard type One-half of the litter is pure black or silver


Previous Fur Farming in Canada (1913) Next