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.234   COMMISSION OF CONSERVATION

together with the railway belt, which is largely forested, constitute, in brief, the region with which this report is concerned. The two latter forests are described later.

 

 

Although the Prairie provinces are usually associated Lumbering   in one's mind with but one pursuit, namely, farming,

Industry

the forested portions give rise to a lumbering industry of importance, and, while inferior in development to that of British Columbia or the eastern provinces, are of great value to the immigrant settlement in the west. In 1913 some 188 mills in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta sawed approximately 250 million feet of lumber, valued at the point of manufacture at over $4,260,000. Of this quantity, Saskatchewan forests produced approximately two-thirds, Alberta one-fifth, and Manitoba the balance. The prairie market consumes about 1,434 million feet of lumber annually. Over one-half of this comes from British Columbia (in part from the Railway Belt portion), and the remainder is supplied from north-western Ontario, the United States, and the home forests.

The lumber production of these provinces necessarily comes very largely from timber land held under license from the Dominion government. The following table shows the distribution of the lumber cut on Dominion lands in 1912-13* :

Crown timber agency

Manufactured

from

licensed berths.

Feet, B.M.

Manufactured

from

permit berths.

Feet, B.M.

Number of   Number of operat mg mills

under nder - portable mills

license   operating

Winnipeg, Man   

63,390,156

5,369,438

27   31

Prince Albert, Sask   

121,786,667

2,628,994

4   16

Edmonton, Alta   

14, 871, 777

11,998,172

24   46

Calgary, Alta   

23,602,764

4,406,796

19   21

Kamloops, B.C   

82,123 038

7,512,175

7

New Westminster, B.C   

23,695,365

14,344,060

11

 

Total    

329,469,767

46,259,635

92

114

In addition to this 375,729,000 feet of lumber, there were manufactured some 508,000 ties, 50,000,000 lath and 69,000,000 shingles.

That the demand on the Dominion forests is a steady and growing one, and of considerable proportions, is shown by the following two sets of tables:

 

*These figures, as well as many others in this report, are taken from the Annual Reports of the Department of the Interior.


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