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PART VI
Forestry on Dominion Lands

 

BY
J. H. WHITE, M.A., B.Sc.F.

Faculty of Forestry, University of Toronto

INTRODUCTION

THIS report, the result of a study made during the summer of 1913, has been prepared in order to emphasize the need for the adoption of the following fire protective measures:

1. Careful consideration of the question of slash disposal is necessary in connection with all cutting operations on Dominion timber lands, with the enforcement of such regulations as may be found suitable in each case. This refers not only to forest reserves, which are under the jurisdiction of the Forestry Branch, but also to all timber limits, including those inside forest reserves and parks, and operations on lands outside forest reserves and parks, all of which are under the jurisdiction of the Timber and Grazing Branch. There is no provision for this at the present time in connection with operations on licensed timber berths, which are under the jurisdiction of the Timber and Grazing Branch. It is, however, wholly possible to take such action without additional legislation, since the licenses all pro-vide that " the licensee . . . . shall dispose of the tops and branches and other debris of lumbering operations in such a way as to prevent as far as possible the danger of fire, in accordance with the directions of the proper officers of the Department of the Interior." Further, the licenses are renewed annually, and are made subject to the terms and conditions fixed by the regulations in effect at the time renewal is made. These regulations at the present time require that, "to prevent the spread of prairie or bush fires, the refuse (i.e., the tops and branches unfit either for rails or firewood) shall be piled together in a heap and not left scattered through the bush." Thus, the situation is adequately provided for, with the exception that there is -no policy calling for the enforcement of these specific requirements, and no organization of personnel at the present time adequate to

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