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220   COMMISSION OF CONSERVATION

TABLE II

NUMBER OF YOUNG TREES PER ACRE, ACCORDING TO AGE BY DECADES, BASED UPON.
11 ACRES OF SAMPLE STRIPS

Age, by decades   Hemlock   Douglas fir

Less than 10 years    44,900

10 to 20 years    7,770

20 to 30 years    6,170

30 to 40 years    3,900

PERCENTAGE OF YOUNG TREES PER ACRE, ACCORDING TO DECADES, AS ABOVE

Total trees

Cedar

54,800 8,340 6,450 4,160

5,000 400 180 100

4,900 170 100 160

Age, by decades

Hemlock, Per cent

Douglas fir, Per cent

Cedar, Per cent

Less than 10 years    

10 to 20 years    

20 to 30 years    

30 to 40 years    

As in the case of the fir, some of the young stands were much more dense than is indicated by the averages, as given in the table above. For example, a small plot in a four-year-old stand disclosed seedlings at the rate of 2,800,000 to the acre. By comparing this table (Table II) with that of the fir (Table I), one will see that there are many more hemlock trees per acre than there were fir trees for the corresponding ages, with the exception of the first age class. In other words, the death rate of the hemlock is not so great as that of the fir, since 82 per cent of the hemlock had died in the second decade, 86 in the third, and 90 per cent in the fourth decade. Whereas, in the case of the fir, less than one in a hundred of the original seedlings was represented in the stands at the end of 39 years; in case of the hemlock ten times as many were represented, that is 10 out of a hundred. The same thing is indicated in the percentage table, where it will be seen the relative proportion of hemlock in the stands does not decrease materially as the trees grow older. All this shows again that the hemlock can endure more crowding and shading than the fir, for it is evident that there would be more shade on an acre containing 4,160 than 790 trees of the same age.

As shown in the tables on the preceding pages, cedar

Cedars are   is a common associate of both fir and hemlock. On Short-lived

the average the greatest extent of this association is

about one-eighth of the stand, but it sometimes ran as high as one-

9 5 3 2

82 93 95 94

9.0 2.0 1.4 4.0


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