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210   COMMISSION OF CONSERVATION

gross receipts which may be derived from the management of these areas. Such an arrangement exists in the administration of the United States National Forests, where 25 per cent of the gross returns is turned over to the states in which the forests are situated, to aid in the maintenance of roads and schools.

Forest   An additional advantage that might be expected to

Experimental   follow the transfer of this area to the Dominion

Station Forestry Branch, under any terms mutually acceptable, would be the local establishment of a forest experiment station, with one or more technically trained men, who would devote their whole

time to investigating silvicultural problems. Such investigations would have for their object the securing of a thorough knowledge of the silvical characteristics and requirements of the various species of forest trees—a solid scientific basis for the silvicultural handling of existing forests, and for the establishment of new forests, to secure the most economic use of the timber and other products of the forest, and a more exact knowledge of its indirect benefits.

Scientific information can be secured only in a systematic manner and by intensive methods of study. So far as forestry work is concerned, such information can best be secured through the establishment of forest experiment stations. This idea has already been developed extensively in other countries, including France, Germany, India and the United States. The silvicultural investigations carried on by the United States Forest Service are classed under the following headings:

Forestation

,General Studies

Seed, production, fertility, methods of extraction, etc.

Nursery practice

Species, methods, and seasons for artificial forestation Sites—limits upon the growth of each species fixed by site conditions

Introduction of exotics

Species

Forest Influences Upon Climate, Stream Flow, Erosion, etc.

Management

General systems and their technical basis

Methods of cutting

Brush disposal

Natural reproduction

Thinnings

Valuation—immature growth, merchantable timber, soil for forest production


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