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200   COMMISSION OF CONSERVATION

and 13 inches in diameter. The numerous fires which have been allowed to run over this area have so reduced the stock that its stumpage value at maturity will be about $1,500,000, or, in other words, the fires have cost, in terms of pine stumpage, nearly $2,400,000, and the dues on the young pine burned would have amounted to $680,000. So the fires have destroyed more than $3,000,000 in poten-

tial pine values. As a result of the fires, however, we have sufficient poplar to make, at maturity, 265,000 cords of pulpwood. Considering this to be worth one dollar a cord when ready to harvest, we have $265,000 to deduct from the cost of the fires. So the final charge against the forest fires, in terms of potential value of pine destroyed, is, approximately, $2,800,000.

While the value of poplar is very much less than that of the pine, yet the successive fires have very materially lessened the potential value of its crop. Assuming the poplar to be worth one dollar a cord on the stump, for pulpwood, and that it could be harvested 30 years hence, the following data may be given in regard to the reduction of its value on the areas burned more than once:

 

TABLE XII
YIELD OP POPLAR 30 YEARS HENCE ON BURNED AREAS, WITH ESTIMATES OP ITS

VALUE AND THE LOSS IN VALUE BY REPEATED FIRES

 

L

y Q

U y

O wl

0

C L c3

.5-24-

0   -

s

b u CL ca3

7-

U

Sr

U:

c

U

V   N

O

L

L L

L

E

a L M

b M U

E

 

 

 

;>'

 

 

O

 

a

r.

 

 

H

Acres    

17,350

17,750

6,970

9,260

51,330

Potential value of poplar 30

years hence if area burned

but once    

$156,150

$159,750

$62,730

$83,340

$461,970

Potential value of the present

stock 30 years hence   

156,150

88,750

17,425

3,000

265,325

Loss on each area   

 

71,000

45,305

80,340

.....

Total loss    

.....

........

196,645

From the figures in the above tables, it will be seen that the value of poplar on the whole area is reduced only 43 per cent by repeated fires, while the reduction in the case of the pine is 60 per cent. This is due to the well-known fact that fires make conditions favourable for the reproduction of poplar. But, in spite of this, some of the areas


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