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EFFECT OF REPEATED FOREST FIRES   197

 

Number of

acres

Average per

Total, cords

acre, cords

Areas burned once    

17,350

9

156,150

"

twice    '~

17,750

5

88,750

"

thrice    '.

6,970

2.5

17,425

 

many times   

9, 260

0.3

3,000

 

Total    

...............

................

265,325

This relationship may be expressed by the following diagram:

BUReaM.   —

()rice   9 Cords

Twice.   5 Cords

Three times   2'SCords

Mcuiytimes I   o.. Cords.

The forecasted yield of poplar per Care, 30years Tram the present date, accord into thenumber of times but'ried.

FINANCIAL LOSSES BY FOREST FIRES

There can be little doubt that, if the public understood the cost of forest fires in terms of the future yield, more efficient methods of protection would be demanded. People do not burn, nor allow to be burned, what they value. It is in the hope of securing a better under-standing of this question that the following estimates of the financial losses due to repeated fires on the Burleigh-Methuen areas are presented.

Repeated   In most lumbering operations, in pine stands, a certain Fires Destroy number of the larger trees, because of disease or de-

Seed Trees formation, escape the axe. Seed from these trees, together with the trees too small to be of commercial value at the time of lumbering, would, if left undisturbed, in time, restock the area to pine. When young, pine is very easily killed by fire. Only in the older stages, after a thick bark is formed and the crown has raised itself out of reach, does it become to any extent resistant to light fires. Large trees readily fall a prey to the heavy fires. The slash left be-hind lumbering operations is almost invariably burned accidentally, sooner or later. If seed trees are left, if the slash is burned within a year or two after lumbering, and especially if the fire comes in a year of a heavy yield of seed, the burning, by clearing the ground of debris, probably stimulates the reproduction of pine. Every fire after the


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