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196   COMMISSION OF CONSERVATION

Assuming the same converting factor as previously, the 450 cubic feet given above becomes an even five cords of pulpwood on the average acre, before deduction is made for decay. Because of the deformed and diseased condition of the young growth on the areas burned three times, as described on page 186 a much larger percentage of it will die, or at least will not make commercial pulpwood, than on the areas burned once and twice; consequently, 50 per cent is deducted on this account, making the estimated yield per acre 2.5 cords. The areas burned three times aggregate 6,970 acres, so the total estimated yield of pulpwood becomes 17,425 cords.

On the areas burned many times, the expected yield of poplar will be as follows:

 

 

TABLE X

NUMBER OF POPLAR TREES PER ACRE AND VOLUME TO BE EXPECTED ON THE AVERAGE ACRE AFTER THE NEXT 30 YEARS ON THE AREAS BURNED MANY TIMES, ASSUMING ALL TREES SURVIVED

Number of trees

Diameter class,
inches

Total volume, cubic feet,
bark excluded

.3

5

 

5.7

3

6

 

7.0

2

7

 

11.5

1

8

 

6.2

1

9

 

6.7

 

 

Total

37.1

If the converting factor of 90 cubic feet to the cord be applied to the above, the average yield per acre becomes 0.4 cord. Since the trees on this area are not " crowded," a smaller deduction may be made for the normal death rate, say, 25 per cent. On this basis, the expected yield will be 0.3 cord per acre. There are 9,260 acres in the burned-many-times areas, so the expected yield on the whole area will be around 3,000 cords.

Probable Yield of Pulpwood

The forecasted yield of poplar 30 years from the present date, according to the number of times the area has been burned, may be summarized as follows:


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