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182   COMMISSION OF' CONSERVATION

TABLE IIB

PRESENT COMPOSITION AND AVERAGE NUMBER OF TREES PER ACRE ON 17,750
ACRES SEVERELY BURNED TWICE, BASED ON SAMPLE STRIPS TOTALING
46.2 ACRES

 

Per cent

Per acre

Trembling aspen    

27.6

144.5

Large-toothed aspen    

21.6

113.0

White pine    

1..6

8.4

Red pine    

1.1

5.7

White birch    

22.4

117.3

White oak    

3.1

16.3

Red oak    

13.7

71.4

Red maple    

6.3

33.0

Sugar maple    

.5

2.6

Balsam    

.5

2.8

White spruce    

.3

1.5

Cedar    

.4

2.1

Basswood    

.6

2.8

White ash    

.3

1.5

Total number of trees per acre    

 

522.9

The areas burned twice in Burleigh township, after making the deductions for swamps, total 8,540 acres. The largest of these is along the east side of Eels brook, in the southern division. This limited area now averages 26 young pine per acre, a high average for an area burned twice, but the lower half of the area at least had a remark-ably large stock of pine before the second burning, about eight years ago. This, as stated on page 174, was 260 trees per acre. The whole area burned twice has, on the average, two pine seed trees per acre, which, in the course of a long time, might bring back the pine, if protected from fire.

The area in the south-eastern portion of Burleigh township, lying between the areas marked as burned once and three times, respectively, on the north, and the area marked as burned three times, on the south, and extending up to Jack lake, in Methuen township, is mostly on granite. It differs in composition from all the other areas in its large amount of oak, about 50 per cent of the stand being red oak and 17 per cent white oak. While the soil is rather thin, and much of the oak naturally stunted, it is probable that considerable quantities would attain commercial size if protected from fire.

As a whole, the areas burned twice now support eight white pine and six red pine, a total of 14 pine trees per acre. The areas burned once contain 110 young pine trees per acre. Therefore, as a whole, the second burning reduced the amount of pine to one-eighth of that on the areas burned once.


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