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FOREST FIRES AND BRUSH DISPOSAL   155

COSTS, SEASON I9II

Wages of temporary labourers    

$534

00

Wages of Forest Service employees    

141

86

Meals furnished temporary labourers    

137

53

81 gallons oil, at 25 cents per gallon    

20

25

Freight on 81 gallons oil    

7

29

Supplies purchased from Bighorn Timber Co   

9

05

Two lb. wicking at 35 cents per lb   

 

70

Freight on food supplies (Dayton-Woodrock)    

27

40

Total cost    $878

08

Area burned over, acres    4,236 Total amount timber removed from above area, ft. B.M... 24,532,875

Amount of timber removed per acre burned over, ft. B.M.   5,791

Cost per acre    $0.207

Cost per M. ft. B.M   0.0357

When brush disposal was initiated, operators throughout this district were very much opposed to it, but now take it as a matter of course, and we have very few complaints from this source. One of our largest operators in the lodgepole type in Wyoming has complained on several occasions of the added responsibility thrown on the operator's shoulders from this source, and has asked that the Service take entire charge of brush disposal, carrying it out at such times as may seem best and meeting the costs from funds deposited by the operator for this purpose from time to time. This is an unusual case, however, and, where the burning is properly supervised by the operator, little trouble occurs. Shortly after piling and burning was initiated we had some trouble with operators because of their lax supervision of this phase of the operations, and, because of a general inclination on their part to consider brush disposal impracticable, they make no effort to carry it out properly. When an honest effort is made to secure efficiency in its disposal, operators secure results at very low cost and rarely, if ever, complain of this feature, particularly in view of the fact that our stumpage appraisals now consider brush disposal as a distinct item of operating costs and allow a rather liberal figure for it.

The only compensating advantages I can think of which ensue to the operator through brush disposal, are the slight reduction in the fire hazard and, as previously mentioned, the slightly increased freedom in skidding operations. If a sufficient margin has been allowed for brush disposal in the stumpage appraisal, I think these two points can really be considered as distinctly advantageous to the operator. How-


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