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144   COMMISSION OF CONSERVATION

District No. 2—Jobbers did not lop

Jobber

No. logs

Working

days

No. men

working

Aver. No.

logs per day

per camp

Aver. No.   Probable

logs per day log run

per man   B. F.

9

1,741

8

7

2171

28   30

 

5,063

16

71

211

 

 

3,078

24

8

192

 

 

9,882

48

221

6201

 

10

308

3

3

103   35

 

2,265

22

3

103

 

1,719

15

3

114

 

4,292

40

9

320

11   2,620

20

4

121   31   27

2,946

24

4

123

 

 

2,046

16

4

128

 

 

7,612

60

12

372

 

12

2,605

17

4

153

31   31

 

2,545

24

4

106

 

 

1,770

16

4

111

 

 

6,920

57

12

370

There is no accurate manner of obtaining data on the number of logs lost per day. Figuring backward from the cost of lopping per

No. feet," we find that it means the loss of four to twelve logs per horse per day, or from one to two logs per man per day.

The average number of logs per day per man in District No. 1 is eight below that in District No. 2. With the liberal allowance of two logs for the added work of top-lopping, there still remains a difference of six logs. This is explained by the inferior quality of the labour employed on District No. 1. On District No. 2 the jobbers and their men are old, experienced hands. Many of the sawyers have themselves been jobbers in previous years, and they thoroughly under-stand their work. On the other hand the jobbers in District No. 1 are many of them new at the work and their men are, with a few exceptions, entirely unaccustomed to woods work. In many instances boys from the larger towns are employed. This class has had no previous experience in logging or with horses. Generally speaking the men working in District No. 1 are but two-thirds to three-quarters as efficient as those in District No. 2. The wages are not correspondingly low, hence costs are high.

The log run in District No. 2 is estimated to be higher than that in District No. 1. This is due to the large number of white pine and big


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