Previous Forest Protection in Canada 1913-1914 Next

 

i. Value of property   destroyed, classified by

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

causes:

(a) Locomotives    

$120,795

$3,168

$629

$16,500

....

$81,000

$5,000

$1G,489

$92,746

$5

$5

 

$117$336,451

(b) Carelessness or negligence of railway

employees    

 

1,941

.:..

....

10

....

5,500

544

40

 

 

 

8,085

(c) Steam shovels, donkey engines, etc.

• • • •

8,800

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8,800

Value of property destroyed, classified as

follows :

(a) Young growth    

2,472

21,114

3,342

2

60

29,400

2,423

703

....

 

....

108

59,624

(b) Standing timber    

1,017

89,392

215

16,650

280

59,368

19,859

16,205

 

1

 

........

202,987

(c) Forest products in process of manu-

facture    

113,230

25,000

498

150

....

13,400

....

....

200

 

 

 

152,478

 

 

(d) Railway property not covered in above

500

5,161

700

....

....

150

552

65

1,230

....

....

44

8,402

(e) Other private property not covered in

above    

5,920

1,829

60

....

1,050

216

....

....

....

100

9,951

 

776....

(f) Total of above    

$123,139

$142,496

$4,815$17,578

$340

$102,318

$23,884

$17,189

$1,430

$1

....

$252

$433,442

*Includes Esquimalt and Nanaimo.

tlncludes Canadian Northern Ontario; Central Ontario; Irondale, Bancroft and Ottawa; Canadian Northern Quebec; Quebec and Lake St. John, and Halifax and Southwestern railways. Above statistics do not include that portion of Canadian Northern Ontario railway lines between Pembroke and Caprcol, and between Rucl and Port Arthur, under construction.

$This column includes statistics for the Boston and Maine; Maine Central; Elgin and Havelock; Western Canada Power and White Pass and Yukon.


Previous Forest Protection in Canada 1913-1914 Next