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SOCIAL, CONDITIONS.   385

from Newfoundland to Ireland. They had flown about three-fourths of the distance when, owing to trouble with their engine, they were obliged to descend in the sea. They were picked up by a Danish tramp steamer, and reached England amidst wild rejoicing, after being given up for lost for many days.

The Post   Since Confederation there has been a great

Office.   improvement in postal facilities, and there

are now more than three times as many post offices as

- in 1867. There were still more offices in 1913, but the introduction of the rural mail delivery system has reduced the num-

ber necessary.   In
1867 it cost ten cents

k      to send a letter to the
United States, and

R~

six cents to send it from one part of Canada 'to another; now it costs only two cents, apart f rom the

WIRELESs TELEGRAPH STATION, GLACE war tax, to send a BAY, CAPE BRrTON.

 

letter to any part of

Canada, the United States, the British Isles, India, or South Africa. In 1913, there passed through the mails about 685 million letters, or about thirty-eight times as manv as in 1868, and nearly 66 million post-cards. The latter were only introduced in 1871.

Telegraphs   Zany thousands of miles of telegraph lines

and and submarine cables have been established Telephones. since 1867. In July, 1894, a new Atlantic cable was laid between Newfoundland and Ireland, and,


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