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CHAPTER XI.

 

SOCIAL, CONDITIONS.

When the last census was taken, eight years Population. ago, in 1911, the population of the Dominion was 7,2o6,643. Thus it had considerably more than doubled since Confederation. Fifty years ago there were only a few hundred white people in the country now divided into Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta; but the population of these three prairie provinces was over one and one-half millions in 1916, or more than four times as great as it was in 19o1. It is officially estimated that the population of the Dominion is now considerably over eight millions.

Immigration. As already mentioned, immense numbers of

new settlers came into Canada in the year preceding the war. During the war immigrants still continued to come, and even in 1916, the year when the smallest number of settlers arrived, over 48,5oo new-comers settled in Canada. It is of interest that in 1916 and 1917 more than three-fourths of Canada's new citizens cause from the United States, and less than one in every fifteen new-comers came from foreign lands overseas.

Growth of During the fifty years since Confederation, the Towns. the old cities, like Halifax, Quebec, Toronto and Montreal, have greatly increased in population; some new cities, such as \Vinnipeg and Vancouver, and many new towns have sprung up, especially in the West; and many country people have moved " into town." The

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