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WARTIMt IN CANADA.   371

long, and 5,100 tons in weight. The building was begun in igoo, but its completion was long delayed, owing to two terrible accidents. In Igo7 part of the steel structure gave way and 6o persons were killed and I I injured. In 1916 the central span fell into the river, when being hoisted into position, and 12 workmen lost their lives.

Temperance During the war the cause of temperance Legislation. did not stand still. Stricter temperance laws were passed in many of the provinces in Igi6-17, and, according to the last issue of the "Canada Year Book," "practical prohibition of the sale of alcoholic liquors, excepting for medical and scientific purposes, is now in force in all the provinces, except Quebec." This province, however, passed a law, in I616, which has reduced the number of licenses in each city, prohibited hotel bars and treating, and limited the quantities of liquor to be kept and sold by druggists.

Death of   On February 17th, iglg, Sir Wilfrid

Sir Wilfrid   Laurier, one of the greatest figures in the

Laurier. political life of Canada, passed from the scene, in his seventy-eighth year, after a very brief illness. For forty-five years he had sat in the Dominion Parliament (after three years' experience in the Quebec Legislature), and for over thirty-one years he had been leader of the Liberal Party. "To the affairs of State in which his life was passed," says Sir Robert Borden, " and to which his wonderful ability was consecrated, he brought remarkable gifts of leadership." " His personality was singularly attractive• and magnetic."

In speaking to the students of the University of Toronto, in 1913, Sir Wilfrid Laurier struck the keynote of his own life—" Go out into the world to service. . . Serve God and your country. Be firm in the right as God gives you to see the right, , , , You may meet


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