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THI; GRtAT WAR.   355

first and captured four British guns that had been lent to the French. In the misty moonlight, soon after mid-night, 2,000 Canadians charged into the midst of 7,000 Germans, drove them from the wood and retook the guns. Nor was that all. For days the Canadians, outflanked, unsupported by heavy artillery, held grimly on against overwhelming odds till reinforcements came. The cost was enormous, but, as Lloyd George, the British Premier, put it, they stood like the Rocky Mountains, " held high the honour of Canada, and saved the British army."

Other Battles In Alay, 1915, the Canadians again proved of 1915 and their mettle in the Battle of Festubert, dur-1916• ing which they were in "the forefront of the fight " for ten days; in the "furious but fruitless" engagement of Givenchy, when they gained their objectives but, owing to lack of support, could not hold them; and in the capture of Courcelette and AIoquet Farm during the great Battle of the Somme. Beginning on Dominion Day, 1916, and lasting till the middle of November, it "placed beyond doubt," Sir Douglas Haig said, " the ability of the Allies to gain " the objects for which they were fighting. In the advance on Courcelette, " French-Canadian troops played a distinguished part in winning back some miles of French soil for their ancient motherland." This engagement is notable, too, for the first appearance of the famous " tanks," which dismayed and appalled the Germans but delighted the hearts of the British soldiers, not only with their effectiveness but with their ungainly oddity. On that first day of their coming into the fight the soldiers followed behind them, laughing uproariously.{

Misfortunes Meanwhile things had not been going well in the East. in the Fast. Bulgaria, which had joined the Teuton alliance in October, 1915, had helped to conquer unhappy Serbia. Montenegro was next overrun;


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