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CHAPTER VI.

VANCOUVER AND BRITISH COLUMBIA.

In 1849 the Hudson's Bay Company re-

ceived a grant of the Island of Vancouver,

on condition of settling it within five years.

of truing to bring in colonists, the company

them away. It set so high a price upon

the land that hardly anyone would buy. In 1854 only five hundred acres had been broken up, and there were scarcely five hundred white people in the

a island, counting the fur-traders. Nevertheless, the company was allowed to keep it for some years longer.

In 1849 an Eng-

lishman, Richard Blanshard, was appointed governor of the island, but, finding that all power was in the com-

SIR JAMES nouGLAS.   pany's hands, he soon resigned.

He was succeeded by James Douglas,>an officer of the company. The new governor was ordered to call an assembly of seven members, and with some difficulty he found seven men qualified to become members. But the house did little except provide for its own expenses. There was also a council of three members.

Gold In 1857 gold was discovered along several Discovered. rivers in New Caledonia, as British Columbia was 'then called. The news spread quickly, and in

(—The Hudson's Bay Company.

But instead tried to keep

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