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CHAPTER IV.

TRADE AND RAILWAYS.

In 1849 the British parliament repealed the Trade Laws. navigation laws, giving the colonies liberty to trade in any part of the world. In the same year control of their postal arrangements was given up to them. Some of them wished to have free trade amongst them-selves; but for several years longer each little province continued to lay import duties on the goods of its neighbours.

The improvement of the canals was still

Railways.   going on, but people were beginning to think of making rail-

" ways ; and from this time, as we shall see, they play a most im-

portant part in the ~•

history of our cotmtrv. Manv were planned, both in Can-

-   ada and the Maritime Provinces. In Can-

THE "LADY Ei,(ciN."   ada several lines were

The first railway engine in Upper   in working

order by Canada (1853)•   1853, and the people

were so eager to have more that, through making them, many towns and townships burdened themselves with debts that hung like a weight on them for years. In 1855 a railway was opened from Halifax to Windsor, in Nova Scotia. One was begun also in New Brunswick between St. John and Shediac.

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