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246   CANADIAN HISTORY rOR BOYS AND GIRLS.

wishes of his councillors, and made appointments to
government offices against their advice. At last all ex-
cept one resigned. As the councillors had a majority in
the assembly, the governor found it difficult to fill their
places, and for -q-erg! months ruled without anv regular
council. This caused
great excitement, but
the Reformers «ere
beaten in the elec-

Y► ~_4`   tions of 1844.

e ; The n e w parlia

ment met at Mont-real instead of Kingston. Amongst i t s members was John A. Macdonald.

During the following summer two fires at Quebec rendered twenty thousand people homeless. Lord Metcalfe and other

persons in England, Canada, and the United States gave generous help to the sufferers.

Metcalfe was slowly dying from an incurable disease, and he left Canada in 1845. In private life he was kind and generous, and had made manv friends in spite of his attack on the hard-won liberty of the colonists.

Nova   Meanwhile, a struggle of the same kind

Scotia. was going on in the Maritime Provinces. Viscount Falkland, the new governor of Nova Scotia, had little tact, and was often put into difficult positions by the disagreements of his councillors. The disputes were especially hot over certain important questions of education.

HOME OF THE POET THO\fA5 ATOORE, AT
STE. ANNE DE BELLEVUE.
(Here the Canadian Boat Song was written.)

Picture

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