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CHAPTER XVI.

 

STRUGGLE FOR REFOR31 IN THE MARITIME
PROVINCES.

 

Need for   During the years of agitation and revolt

Reform. in Canada the battle for liberty was also being fought, though rather less fiercely, in the Maritime Provinces. The selfish tyranny of the officials and the mismanagement of the public lands

and public money caused endless com-   7w.
plaints.:.

New   The assembly of New   - Brunswick. Brunswick had no control

over the revenue or government money,   j for the large sums derived from the

sale of the Crown lands were more than enough for the payment of the -over-

nor, judges, and other officials. In 1832

it demanded an account of the way in

which this money was spent, but the   

governor-general, Sir A r c h i b a l d   A JUDGE.
Campbell, was opposed to reform, and no account was given.

In 1833 separate legislative and executive councils were formed in New Brunswick. But as all the members of the new executive council belonged to the Family Compact, this step neither satisfied the Reformers nor gave more power to the assembly.

Lemuel   About this time a lawyer named Lemuel

Allan   Allan Wilmot entered the assembly and

Wilmot.   became the leader of the Reformers, though he was related to some of the officials. He

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