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THE GREAT WEST AND LORD SELKIRK'S SETTLEMENTS. 193

 

dreary shores, and in the spring pushed on to the Red River. They quickly built a little fort named Douglas, for fear of the Indians, but the Nor'-westers were really more to be dreaded. They tried to frighten away the newcomers by every means in their power. It is said, for instance, that they drove away the herds of bisons, or buffaloes, as they are generally called, upon which the settlers at first depended chiefly for food. They were thus obliged to follow them to their distant pastures, but returned in the spring to the Red River.

BUFFALOES FLEEING BEFORE A PRAIRIE FIRE.
(From the painting by F. A. Verner, R.C.A.)

Buffalo   When fresh meat was not to be had they

Meat. ate " pemmican." This was buffalo meat dried, ground to powder, and made solid with melted fat. Stored in bags made from skins of the beasts, it was often kept for years, and though it sometimes tasted like " bad tallow," it was said to be wholesome. It was easily carried and convenient for travellers, and was very useful in the early days of the colony.

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