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CHAPTER VI.
THE END OF THE WAR, 1814.

Lacolle   The people of Lower Canada were over-

Mill. joyed with their success in driving back the invaders, and the assembly promptly voted supplies to carry on the war. But the Americans still hoped to conquer Canada. In March an army again crossed the frontier, and tried to take Lacolle Mill, a strong stone building defended by 500 men. But their guns were too light to batter down the walls. The invaders were beaten off with loss, and soon recrossed the boundary."

Oswego   The Americans had collected great quanti-

Captured. ties of stores at Oswego for the supply of their fleet on Lake Ontario, but in May the British naval commander, Yeo, attacked and took the fort. The Americans, however, had put most of the stores beyond his reach.

England was at last able to send out large bodies of troops to Canada, for Napoleon had been beaten and was shut up in the little island of Elba. The Americans were again threatening the upper province, and reinforcements were most sorely needed there.

Battle of   Early in July an American army crossed

Chippewa. the Niagara River, and took possession of Fort Erie, which the British did not try to defend. They then marched towards Chippewa Creek, but were met by a body of British troops tinder General Riall, and a fierce fight took place. Both sides lost many men, and General Riall, whose force was the smaller, was obliged to retreat towards Fort George. The Americans followed him, but

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