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CHAPTER V.

WAR WITH THE UNITED STATES, 1813. At the end of 1812 there was a short

Frenchtown.

breathing-time, but both sides used it to make preparations for going on with the war. Before the close of January an American army advanced to-wards Detroit. Colonel Pr or, in command there, marched out to meet it, and, attacking the Americans suddenly when they were resting at Frenchtown, captured their general and five hundred men. This saved Michigan to the British for a time.

Ogdensburg During the winter, parties of Americans Attacked. often crossed the St. Lawrence on the ice and plundered the Canadian settlements. On one occasion a party from Ogdensburg burnt several houses in Brockville, and carried off fifty of the townspeople as prisoners. Determined to repay them for this, a body of the militia, called the Glengarry Fencibles, crossed the ice to Ogdensburg, and in spite of a hot fire from the Americans, struggled up the slippery bank. They then swept their foes from their position, burnt the barracks, and returned to their own side of the river with a train of sleighs laden with Captured arms and stores.

Help from   British ships were now regaining the con-the Maritime trol of the ocean, and the Maritime Prov-

Provinces. inces, fearing no attack more serious than the raids of privateers along their coasts, sent both men and money to help in the defence of Canada. In March a few regular troops, raised in New Brunswick, marched on snowshoes through the wilderness that lay between

 

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