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THE ASSEMBLIES AND THEIR WORK.   161

 

The Jay   In 1794 an American statesman named Jay

Treaty. went to England, and many matters were. settled over which there had long been disputes. The

United States government promised, under certain conditions, to pay the Loyalists sums which they had lost through not being permitted to collect debts due to them, and in return the British gave up Niagara and the other western forts in 1796. Men were appointed by both nations to decide on a boundary line between Maine and New Brunswick, but they could agree upon part of it only, and later the question caused much trouble.

A New   After Fort Niagara

Capital.   was given up, Simcoe wished to remove the govern-

ment from Newark, which was within range of the American guns. At last it was decided to build a town where Toronto now stands, though the ground was swampy and only a solitary Indian wigwam stood on the spot. During the first winter Simcoe lived in a tent, or canvas house, once belonging to Captain Cook; but soon a little village, named York in honour of one of the king's sons, sprang tip by the lake.

Simcoe made several rough journeys through the province, partly on foot ; and soon he set his soldiers to cut roads to open up the country, but several of those he planned were never finished. He also tried to encourage the people to farm in a better way, and to break up more land.

GOVERNOR SIMCOE'S STATUE
AT TORONTO.

PP

Picture

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