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EXPLORERS AND FUR-TRADERS.   149

 

Strong enough, and in the following summer a Spanish war-vessel took both his house and his ships.

Spanish   Spain claimed the whole Pacific coast,

Claims. though her nearest settlement was many hundred miles south of Nooktka. But the English were very angry, and talked of war till the Spaniards

promised to give up Nootka, and

to pay Captain Meares for his losses. It was also agreed that either Spaniards or Englishmen might settle on anv unoccupied lands.

In 1792 the British government sent Captain Vancouver, who had sailed round the world with Cook, to receive Nootka back from the Spaniards, and to explore the Pacific coast. He gave the names, which they still bear,

to many capes, bays and inlets; and Vancouver Island is called after him.,

The During these years the fur-traders from Fur-traders. Montreal were pushing their way westward and northward. Six or eight men generally went together. They were supplied by Montreal merchants with goods, for which they paid on their return. They usually stayed away a year or longer, and often spent the profits of their journeys in drinking and gambling.

The Hud-   Meanwhile, the traders of the Hudson's

son's Bay   Bay Company were also pushing farther

Company, into the wilds. One of these, Samuel Hearne, succeeded, after two unsuccessful efforts and after suffering many hardships, in finding a way by the Coppermine River to the Arctic Ocean. This was in 1771. A little later he travelled far west up the Saskatchewan.

CAPTAIN VANCOUVER.

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