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CHAPTER V.
EVENTS IN THE MARITIME PROVINCES.

 

Unfair Most of the Nova Scotians were true to Trade Laws. Great Britain all through the war, though they were closely connected with New England and suffered much from unfair trade laws. For instance, the

British g o v-

ernment for-bade the working of the coal mines in Cape Breton Island, for fear that English merchants might lose some of their profits. At one time, indeed, no grants of land were given in the island lest

someone should dare to dig up the coal. About the time when the passing of the Stamp Act caused so much trouble in Boston; the governor of Nova Scotia wrote to England, as if it were something to be proud of, that though some of the people made coarse cloth and linen and yarn for their own use, no one in the country made a trade of weaving. In our times most governors would feel sorry to have to say such a thing.

When the war began the governor forbade his people to send away firearms without special leave, or to trade 133

PRIMITIVE WEAVING LOOM.

Picture

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