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CHAPTER II.

THE KING'S PROCLAMATION AND THE
QUEBEC ACT.

Canada   During the three years since the surrender

under of Montreal, Canada had been under mar-Martial Law. tial law, that is to say, it had been governed by officers of the army without the help of any parliament or judges. The officers had been so kind and fair to

the Canadians that they did not wish for any change. Put when France gave up her claims on Canada, George III. and his aclvisers felt ,that the country ought to have a more settled form of government, and judges and courts of justice.

The Accordingly, Icing Proclama- George made what tion, 176,1. was called a pro-

clamation, giving many orders

with regard to America! Amongst other things,ihe commanded that Canada, or the Province of Quebec, as it was now named, should have a new government and that the islands of Cape Breton and St. John should be put under the government of Nova Scotia. SHe also forbade people to drive the redmen from their hunting-grounds,

%y and ordered that when lands were needed for settlement, the governments of the different colonies should buy them fairly from the Indians.

GEORGE III.

II,

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