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CHAPTER XII.
THE FALL OF QUEBEC.

English   It was now planned that General Amherst

Plans,   should take Ticonderoga, Crown Point, and

1759. Montreal, and should then join Wolfe be-fore Quebec. But the French did not mean to give up Canada without a struggle; and, though Niagara, Ticonderoga, Crown Point, and several other forts were soon in the hands of the English, Amherst spent so much time in repairing the old forts and building new ones that he did not reach Montreal that year.

Wolfe, with a force of eight thousand five

At Quebec.

hundred well-trained soldiers, sailed up the St. Lawrence towards the end of June, 1759. He was aided by a powerful fleet under Admiral Saunders. The troops landed on the Isle of Orleans, a little below Quebec. On the following night a fearful storm sank some of the smaller vessels, and the French vainly tried to set the rest on fire by sending burning ships down the stream. Soon afterwards Wolfe began to throw shells and red-hot shot into Quebec. They set the Lower Town on fire, but did not harm the fortifications. —

Montcatm   Some of Wolfe's men encamped just below

on Guard. the Falls of Montmorenci, but they could not land anywhere near Quebec. For a long distance above the city the banks of the St. Lawrence are high and rocky, while below, Montcalm, with fourteen thou-sand men, was grimly waiching every movement of his foe. At last Wolfe tried to land his men in spite of 'iim, but they were beaten back with terrible loss. The

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