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THE BOUNDARY QUARRELS.   87

began to cut down the trees and to put up shelters for themselves. Most of these were rude log huts, but amongst them were a few frame houses built of boards

brought from Boston.

Numerous as they were, the colonists suffered from the ill-will of the Indians. Every night some men had to mount guard while the others slept, but before winter their dwellings were securely enclosed by a strong wooden palisade. The town was named Halifax, and from the first was the seat of government for the province.

Colonel Edward Cornwallis, the English Cornwallis. governor who came out with the settlers, was energetic and painstaking. During his three years in Nova Scotia he built forts, formed a militia, and set up courts of justice. He also tried to persuade the Acadians to take the oath of allegiance; but the agents of the French governor were still busy amongst them, and they refused. When the English built Fort Lawrence, at Beaubassin, Le Loutre persuaded the Acadians to flee to the French fort of Beausejour, on the opposite side of the River Missiguash, and, to prevent their return, he set fire to their houses. The men of the two forts were constantly coming to blows. Indeed, the French and English quarrelled wherever they met in America, for, though the home governments tried to decide on a boundary line, they could not agree, and both French and English colonies took by force as much land as they could.

.L   ,.

A LADY OF THE TIME.

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