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CHAPTER IX.

THE BOUNDARY QUARRELS.

La During La Jonquiere's captivity, Count de Galissoniere. la Galissoniere, also a naval officer, acted as governor of Canada. He made collections of the products of the country, encouraged La Verendrye's north-western explorations, and tried to take possession of the Ohio valley for France. He begged that forts might be built and colonists sent to people the great west. The forts were built, but they only provoked the English, and the colonists never came.

La Galissoniere also tried to persuade or to frighten the Acadians to move into the debatable land which we now call New Brunswick. One of his most active agents was a Jesuit named Le Loutre ; but many of the Roman Catholic fathers had a higher idea of their duty. The priest at Grand Pre, for instance, refused to mix himself up with the governor's plots.

The British During these years, though the French Government. were so eager to regain the country, Nova Scotia was utterly neglected by its British rulers. But at last they suddenly became anxious to make it into a British province in fact as it was in name ; and soldiers, farmers, merchants, and skilled workmen were persuaded, by the offer of free lands and free living for a whole year, to go out thither.

Halifax   In the summer of 1749, 2.500 English col-

Founded,   onists entered Chebucto Harbour. Land-

1749.   ing at the foot of a hill, so thickly wooded
that " no clear spot was to be seen or heard of," they
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