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BOOK IL

New France and Its Royal
Governors.

CHAPTER I.
DE TRACY AND TALON.

 

The   Canada had now become a royal province,

Sovereign   and Louis XIV. put the government into

Council,   the hands of a council which had to

1663. account only to himself for its actions. Its three chief members were the governor, the bishop, and the intendant. The governor had control of the soldiers of the colony, and was regarded as its head. But the intendant had as much real power. It was his duty to see that the public money was spent properly, and that the laws were obeyed ; and he was allowed, if he chose, to try cases instead of leaving them to the regular courts. The council was to be guided by the French laws known as the Custom of Paris. From the first the plan of dividing the chief power amongst several persons caused bitter quarrels.

The   The Iroquois were as troublesome as ever;

Marquis   but Canada was no longer neglected and

de Tracy. forgotten. The king sent out two thousand persons at his own cost, and the Marquis de Tracy, the viceroy of all the colonies of France, himself came to Canada in 1665 to force the savages to submit. He is described as a tall, stout old gentleman, and was remark-

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