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THE INDIANS AND THE MISSIONARIES.   37

 

as if they really belonged to their tribes. Some of the Hurons were thus adopted.

The different governors of New France, who at this time rarely held the position long, were often at their wits' end to protect the colony. The settlers were too few to hold the savages in check, and their earnest entreaties for aid from France were not heeded. Year after year the merciless raids went on, though the cunning Iroquois often tried to deceive the French, as they deceived their Indian foes, by pretending to wish for peace.

Teachers   Once, for instance, one of the Five Nations,

sent to the the Onondagas, asked for teachers to show Onondagas. them how to do different' kinds of work. Their request was granted, but it was only a plot to get some of the French into their power. The Onondagas had hardly left Quebec with their teachers when the Mohawks, another Iroquois tribe, carried off some Hurons, and plundered several houses near Quebec; but the townspeople dared not fire a shot lest their countrymen should be murdered. The latter soon discovered their danger, and made a plan to escape, secretly preparing some boats for the purpose. A Frenchman then pretended to be ill, and, according to a strange Indian custom, invited the Onondagas to a " medicine feast." which was supposed to. cure the sick man if each man ate all that was set before him. This time each guest was provided with an enormous quantity of food, and long before the feast was over the French got out their boats and slipped quietly away. When morning da vned, and the Indians discovered that they had gone, they were far on their way towards Quebec and safety Defence of Several years after this it was rumoured

the Long that the Iroquois, many of whom had Sault, 1660. wintered on the Ottawa, were preparing to attack the French from several points at once. But


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