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THE INDIANS AND THE MISSIONARIES.   33

out three nuns to look after the poor and the sick; and these brave women began their work when the smallpox was raging amongst the Christian Indians near Quebec...

Meanwhile, far in the wilderness, the The Jesuits. Jesuits were labouring to win the war-like Hurons to Christianity. At first they treated the missionaries kindly, building them a long bark house, which was divided into chapel, store-room, and living-room. For a time the priests were followed all day long by

curious crowds who wished to see their handmill grinding corn, or to hear the ticking of their clock.' They patiently taught all who would listen, bribing the children with peas-porridge to learn hymns and the catechism ; but it was slow and painful work. The " medicine-men," or " rainmakers," hated them. In times of drought or sickness they pre-tended that the crosses of " the black-robes " frightened away "the Bird of

Thunder," and that their witchcrafts

brought the smallpox. If the priests   HANDMILL FOR

GRINDING CORN.

baptized a dying child, as they often

did, the "medicine-men " said that they had charmed away its life. Many a time they were in danger of being tortured to death, but at length they gained the love of the savages, and made many converts.,

Montreal   About this time, the town of Montreal was

Founded,   founded by a society formed for the con-

1642. version of the Indians. When the new settlers arrived at Quebec, the people there begged them to go no farther. But they believed that they had been commanded by God to go to Montreal, so they pressed on under the leadership of Sieur de Maisonneuve. The

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