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CHAPTER VI.
THE INDIANS AND THE MISSIONARIES.

The   After Champlain's death the Iroquois be-

Iroquois. came more and more daring. Indeed it seemed for a time as if they might utterly destroy the colony. They lay in wait for travellers; they killed

men at work in the fields; they carried off children; and they ruined the fur trade by preventing other Indians from coming to Quebec.

The new governor, Montmagny, a brave soldier, begged for help from France, but the Hundred Associates would not listen to him. Their great object was to make money, and, in spite of their promises, they neither sent out fresh settlers nor took care of those already in the colony.

The   The religious people of France, however,

Religious   took a great interest in Canada. During

Orders. these years of danger and misery many priests and nuns crossed the sea and came to live in the wilds. A rich widow, Madame de la Peltrie, came to Quebec with two nuns, to found a school for Indian girls. At the same time another wealthy court lady sent

MONUMENT TO CHAMPLAIN
AT QUEBEC.

'32

Picture

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